Information for "Left-right political spectrum"

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Display titleLeft-right political spectrum
Default sort keyLeft-right political spectrum
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Page creatorRobLa (talk | contribs)
Date of page creation23:00, 7 October 2020
Latest editorKristomun (talk | contribs)
Date of latest edit10:12, 21 March 2022
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The left–right political spectrum (also called a "uniform linear political spectrum") is a system of classifying political positions, ideologies and parties from social equality on the left to social hierarchy on the right. The intermediate stance is called centrism and a person with such a position is a moderate or centrist. On this type of political spectrum, left-wing politics and right-wing politics are often presented as opposed, although a particular individual or group may take a left-wing stance on one matter and a right-wing stance on another; and some stances may overlap and be considered either left-wing or right-wing depending on the ideology.[1] In France, where the terms originated, the left has been called "the party of movement" and the right "the party of order".[2][3][4][5]
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