Sainte-Laguë method

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Webster/Sainte-Laguë works like D'Hondt method, except that you use divisors 1, 3, 5, 7, ... instead of 1, 2, 3, 4, ...

In the modified Sainte-Laguë method, the first divisor is modified to 1.4. The sequence of divisors is then 1.4, 3, 5, 7, ...

The modified Sainte-Laguë method is used for elections to the Danish parliament.

There is a longer article on Wikipedia on the same subject.

Notes[edit | edit source]

Webster, unlike D'Hondt, doesn't guarantee that a majority of voters will get at least half of the seats.[1]

35-seat example
Party Votes Votes % 2nd-to-last round seats 2nd-to-last round divisors Final seats Final divisors Seats %
A 503 50.3% 16 15.2424 (503/33) 17 14.3714 (503/35) 48.57%
B 304 30.4% 10 14.4762 (304/21) 11 13.2174 (304/23) 31.43%
C 193 19.3% 6 14.8461 (193/15) 7 12.8666 (193/15) 20%
Total seats awarded 32 35

If D'Hondt had been used, the final divisor would've been 27.944, with (results calculated by rounding down to the nearest number) Party A getting 18 seats out of 35, a 51.42% majority (503/27.944), B 10 seats (304/27.944), and C 6 seats.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Miller, Nicholas R. (2014-12-05). "Election Inversions under Proportional Representation" (PDF). Scandinavian Political Studies. Wiley. 38 (1): 4–25. doi:10.1111/1467-9477.12038. ISSN 0080-6757. Retrieved 2020-03-24.